Promethean Idealism

This category provides the Promethean aspect to the Postliberal project, and will categorize a number of authors into this tradition and go through what they meant by some of the terms they used.

Franklin Merrell-Wolff

  • Ananda
  • Arya – Those who return from Nirvana to Divinely rule Sangsara:
  • Atman – The pure/true self:
    References:
    https://www.merrell-wolff.org/fmw/philosophy
  • Conception – Knowledge by logical necessity:
  • Conscious Introception
  • Consciousness without an object
  • Conviction – Holding a certain position, that is an element of personal identification: Convictions are deeply held positions that you’ve adopted, through other factors than rational judgement, where feelings are involved and are a source of your identity. Convictions can only be changed through more profound Realization, and changing a Conviction would change your total being.
    References:
    https://www.merrell-wolff.org/fmw/philosophy
  • Convincement – Holding a certain position, as a result of a conscious judgment without a change of psychological state: Convincements are the superficial positions you hold, but that could be relatively easily changed by rational methods of argumentation, and if you were to change what you’re convinced of, it wouldn’t change your total being.
    References:
    https://www.merrell-wolff.org/fmw/philosophy
  • Current of Ambrosia
  • Faith – Unconscious Introception:
  • Fundamental Realization
  • Gonsis (Higher)
  • Gnosis (lower) – Conscious Introception:
  • High Indifference
  • Introception – Knowledge by identity:
  • Lila – Divine play: [A process of un-Divinization, for the purpose of re-Cognition].
  • Modes of Cognition – Wolff splits up cognition into 3 categories: For Wolff there’s 3 distinct modes of cognition; Conception, Perception, Introception, of which the last one is unique to Wolff.
    References:
    Merrell-Wolff, F. (1973). The Philosophy of Consciousness Without an Object.
    https://www.merrell-wolff.org/fmw/philosophy
  • Nirvana – The collapsing of the (subject-object) polarity into a kind of static peace: To see that something isn’t really there as an object, collapsing into a sort of nothingness.
  • Paranirvana – The coexistence of Sangsara and Nirvana:
  • Perception – Knowledge by sense-empiricism:
  • Point-I
  • Primordial Consciousness
  • Realization
  • Relative Consciousness
  • Sangsara – The subject-object world: This is the linear, wordly experience we experience all the time in our material life. That is to say, Sangsara is the material world.
  • Space-I
  • Transcendental Consciousness
  • Unconscious Introception

Jean Gebser

  • Aperspectivity – Transcending the restricted perspective: [Aperspectivity is about realizing that there isn’t merely a fixed point you’re working with, but there are also considerations of surrounding context and time, with multiple perspectives being possible. This allows one to both be able to acquire a holistic understanding, as well as a detailed/particular understanding.]
    References:
    Gebser, J. (1986). The Ever-Present Origin.
    http://www.jean-gebser-gesellschaft.ch/foundations.html
    http://www.jean-gebser-gesellschaft.ch/mutations.html
  • Archaic Consciousness – The first form of Consciousness: This consciousness is characterized by being a group consciousness where there is no individual, only the whole, and total absence of differentiation; no differentiation between between self and other, soul and nature, the individual and the universe. Gebser calls this ‘zero-dimensional’.
    References:
    Gebser, J. (1986). The Ever-Present Origin.
  • Consciousness – Being Present:
    References:
    Gebser, J. (1986). The Ever-Present Origin.
  • Ever-Present Origin
  • Integral Consciousness – The fifth form of Consciousness: This form of consciousness is characterized by ‘being’ giving way to ‘transparency’. Instead of categorizations of the world being static (and eternal), there is a recognition that there are different possible/alternative structures [and how they connect]. E.g. that a house could be designed in alternative ways [or…]. Here we therefore also get the notion of ‘presentation’ where all valid structures are presented against each other, before deciding which one to live through. E.g. choosing between alternative business models for a business. This allows one to ‘live through’ the structures instead of being ‘subjected to’ the structures.
    References:
    Gebser, J. (1986). The Ever-Present Origin.
  • Magical Consciousness – The second form of Consciousness: This form of consciousness is characterized by singular people, objects, and events that differentiates themselves from the whole (by accident); one-dimensional “points”. It is important to note that symbols do not just represent those people, objects, or events, but are those people, objects, or events, which ties into how David Olson describes illiteracy as not being able to differentiate between sign and cause. This is about the performative effect/aspect of language.
    References:
    Gebser, J. (1986). The Ever-Present Origin.
    Olson, D. R. (1994). The world on paper: The conceptual and cognitive implications of writing and reading
  • Mental Consciousness – The fourth form of Consciousness: This form of consciousness is characterized by its appropriation of people, objects and events using logic. It’s three-dimensional, which he illustrates as a trinity between thesis, antithesis, synthesis; this should be thought of as a triangle with thesis-antithesis at the bottom, which points toward a unified synthesis. It’s this directing that Perspectivity emerges from, and allows for directed thought and discourse. Space also opens up to the consciousness which he will use his thinking to master, as well as Linear Time.
    References:
    Gebser, J. (1986). The Ever-Present Origin.
  • Mythical Consciousness – The third form of Consciousness: This form of consciousness is characterized by people, objects, and events being woven together into stories, creating myths and mythologies that enables a coherence in Consciousness. [It is two-dimensional…], and Cyclical Time is discovered from the rhythmic recurrence of natural events.
    References:
    Gebser, J. (1986). The Ever-Present Origin.
  • Perspectivity – Locating the observer as well as the observed: The observer and the observed exist independently of each other, as well as independently of other things and people. There is a tension here; the more perspective you have (the more you focus on something specific), the more you are blind to your surroundings, which can result in a myopic viewpoint.
    References:
    Gebser, J. (1986). The Ever-Present Origin.
    http://www.jean-gebser-gesellschaft.ch/foundations.html
    http://www.jean-gebser-gesellschaft.ch/mutations.html
  • Proligio – [Understanding of the sacred] in Magical Consciousness: Gebser doesn’t really view Religion under Magical Consciousness as actual Religion, as there only exist sacred ‘points’ in which magical man’s closeness to the origin makes it illusory to speak of as actual Religion.
    References:
    http://www.jean-gebser-gesellschaft.ch/foundations.html
  • Praeligio – [Understanding of the sacred] in Integral Consciousness: This form of Religion is without expectation of anything, as [the potential for] anything and everything is latent in ourselves and realized through Praeligio. Since the notion of ‘presentation’ is not merely a tie to the past, but also an incorporation of the future, Praeligio is a commitment to emergent transparency, where as soon as one becomes aware of structures, it enables one to perceive them and to impart the truth of the integrity/whole.
    References:
    http://www.jean-gebser-gesellschaft.ch/foundations.html
  • Religio – [Understanding of the sacred] in Mythical Consciousness:
    References:
    http://www.jean-gebser-gesellschaft.ch/foundations.html
  • Religion – [Understanding of the sacred] in Mental Consciousness:
    References:
    http://www.jean-gebser-gesellschaft.ch/foundations.html
  • Structures of Consciousness – The 5 types of Consciousness: Gebser identifies 5 types of Consciousness. He describes that these structures arose one by one over human history, as the previous structure became deficient [because…]. It is important to note that Gebser does not see the structures of Consciousness as a gradual evolution, but as hard-break mutations, and that all the structures operate together alongside the most recent structure.
    References:
    Gebser, J. (1986). The Ever-Present Origin.
    http://www.jean-gebser-gesellschaft.ch/mutations.html
  • The Rational Structure of Awareness – Deficient form of Mental Consciousness: A structure that seeks to deny the other structures with its claim that humans are exclusively rational.
    References:
    Gebser, J. (1986). The Ever-Present Origin.

Julius Evola

  • Anagogic – Transcendent view of human existence: For Evola, the Anagogic is transcendent/divine, where the action you take, how you live your life, your ideals and beliefs are based on a higher purpose.
    References:
    Evola, J. (2013). Fascism viewed from the right.
    https://heathenharvest.wordpress.com/2014/02/24/fascism-viewed-from-the-right-by-julius-evola/
  • Apotheosis
  • Ascetic
  • Catagogic – Materialist view of human existence: For Evola, the Catagogic is almost animalistic, and lowly, where the action you take, how you live your life, your ideals and beliefs are based on mundane, material reasons.
    References:
    Evola, J. (2013). Fascism viewed from the right.
    https://heathenharvest.wordpress.com/2014/02/24/fascism-viewed-from-the-right-by-julius-evola/
  • Chakravartin – The balanced wheel: The Chakravartin are the universally balanced rulers; the people who rule all peoples in a balanced/fair manner.
  • Demonic – The earthly:
  • Esoteric
  • Exoteric
  • Ignis Essentiae – Finding and witnessing the essence of a man:
  • Left-Hand Path – Being willing to be hated, and the enemy, to make life deeper: Refers to when you’re (willing to) take the position as an opponent in order to affectuate change/learning/apotheosis in the one(s) you wish to teach something.
    References:
    https://www.counter-currents.com/2016/03/dionysus-and-the-left-hand-path/
  • Right-Hand Path
  • Telluric – Forces of degeneration: The Telluric are all the forces that degenerate the spirit of man and civilization.

Mircea Eliade

  • Axis Mundi – The center of the world: Axis Mundi is the center of the world, understood as something that is centrally Sacred, the point which the entire Sacred order originates from, and from where the world gradually gets sacralized from. Axis Mundi has traditionally had a physical embodiment.
    References:
    Eliade, M. (1961). The Sacred and the Profane: The Nature of Religion.
  • Cosmology
  • Cyclical Time – The time where you return to the Sacred: Cyclical Time are the Eternally Returning traditions and events that happen every year, like new years or christmas. Eliade writes that it is the return of traditions that give meaning to our existence, as traditions takes us back to what was meaningful, I.e. Sacred.
    References:
    Eliade, M. (1971). The Myth of the Eternal Return: Cosmos and History.
  • Eternal Return – A return to the golden age/the time before time: The Eternal Return is that we continually seek to return to the golden age, the good times, through ritual. Ritual returns us to this state by actualizing the myth, allowing the myth make its mark on the current (Profane) time.
    References:
    Eliade, M. (1961). The Sacred and the Profane: The Nature of Religion.
    Eliade, M. (1971). The Myth of the Eternal Return: Cosmos and History.
  • Hierophany – Manifestations of the Sacred in the physical world: Hierophanies are physical manifestations and appear as ideal models that humans should strive towards/aspire towards, a Sacred center that man can use to orient their existence in the Profane world. For example, the 10 commandments, Jesus/Mohammed.
    References:
    Eliade, M. (1961). The Sacred and the Profane: The Nature of Religion.
  • Homo Religiosus – Human existence is fundamentally religious: Eliade describes the earliest humans as ‘Homo Religiosus’ as they were an explicitly religious “animal” whose primary concern was always to stay as close to Sacred space as possible at all times, through Myths and Rituals. It’s important to emphasize that man is still Homo Religiosus with Sacreds and Profanes, Myths and Rituals, Axis Mundis and Hierophants, etc. Eliade for example views scientists as attempting to return to the Sacred time of origins in their own way.
    References:
    Eliade, M. (1961). The Sacred and the Profane: The Nature of Religion.
    Eliade, M. (1963). Myth and Reality.
    Dubose, T. (2000). Lordship, Bondage, and the Formation of Homo Religiosus.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mircea_Eliade#Religious_survivals_in_the_secular_world
  • Linear Time – The Profane unfolding of time: Linear Time is the march of events, completely devoid of any value or sacrality. To Eliade, this creates anxiety in man, in that there’s no inherent meaning (created) in anything that happens, and thus nihilistic.
    References:
    Eliade, M. (1971). The Myth of the Eternal Return: Cosmos and History.
  • Myth – Describes the Sacred’s first appearance: Only what is Sacred is meaningful, and the time when the Sacred appeared is thus Sacred time/Mythical time, when the meaningful happened. Eliade believes this is why we have nostalgia for a certain (time)period, to return to a primordial paradise.
    References:
    Eliade, M. (1961). The Sacred and the Profane: The Nature of Religion.
  • Profane – The meaningless: The Profane is everything that has not been sacralized, not been incorporated into the Sacred’s structuring of the world. It doesn’t have any direction or structure to it, and simply just exist (or rather, doesn’t really exist) until it has become sacralized.
    References:
    Eliade, M. (1961). The Sacred and the Profane: The Nature of Religion.
  • Ritual – Carrying one back to the Sacred: Traditions are not merely commemorations of important events, but are literally opening up and taking one back to the Sacred when it happened. It unites one with the Sacred, giving one’s existence value.
    References:
    Eliade, M. (1961). The Sacred and the Profane: The Nature of Religion.
    Eliade, M. (1971). The Myth of the Eternal Return: Cosmos and History.
  • Sacred – The meaningful: The Sacred is what orders our world, it is what gives our world structure and direction/orientation, and thus what makes it meaningful. For something to become meaningful it first has to be sacralized, inagurated into the Sacred order. The Sacred basically founds the world.
    References:
    Eliade, M. (1961). The Sacred and the Profane: The Nature of Religion.
  • Shaman – Someone who can return man to the Sacred time: A Shaman is someone who can return man to the Sacred time, before the fall into Profane time.
    References:
    Eliade, M. (1951). Shamanism: Archaic Techniques of Ecstasy.
  • Theophany – Appearance of God/the Divine: A Theophany is when God appears in world. For example, when God appears to Moses in the form of a burning bush.
    References:
    Eliade, M. (1961). The Sacred and the Profane: The Nature of Religion.

Sri Aurobindo

  • Insight
  • Overmind
  • Paranirvana
  • Supermind
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